Cherry Saturday, April 13, 2019

Today is Scrabble Day, celebrating a brilliant game that’s now so iconic they make jewelry out of vintage pieces (has to be wood tiles, not the plastic). What other game demands the use of a dictionary and a million ways to use Q and X? I wouldn’t even know what “qi” meant without Scrabble. Best game ever (although Clue runs a close second for many reasons I will not go into here).

Happy Scrabble Day!

39 thoughts on “Cherry Saturday, April 13, 2019

  1. We did a Clue & Clue birthday party for me a few years back. We dressed as the characters, watched the movie, and played the game for the first time in years.

    I was bored with it! Maybe because I’ve played so many other games since. Clue Jr has the better game play, but I think it’s OOP.

    My kid got me a Scrabble tile necklace one holiday. I should wear it today.

    If anyone wants game recs, I’m your person. Just say what age/style you like, and I can save you from a life of Life. 😂

    8+
  2. Scrabble, when you throw down axe with a triple letter score for the X!

    Didn’t play it too often though because we never had enough players at home.

    5+
  3. There is an online version I play from time to time with my daughter in London.
    And when my son was little we played Equate which is a form of math scrabble. The strategy in that game is all about keeping the zero tiles since zero times anything is zero.

    5+
  4. Count me in. Big game in my family. I’ve got several boards, even the Superscrabble size, plus the kid’s version.

    I prefer the older versions because the boards were less busy looking. Although the ones that turn are kinda handy.

    And like so many board games, the playing is fun but the family time and memories that come out of playing are priceless. Plus, you know things are getting serious when the Scrabble dictionary comes out;)

    4+
  5. Scrabble is not my game although I love Boggle and Quirkle and Letter Tycoon. My husband likes Rail Baron although he will play Ticket to Ride since I will rarely consent to play a game that takes from 2 to 10 hours.

    For those of you who play games with children of various ages, Quirkle is the best. It is like dominos except you are matching shapes and colors so reading and counting are not a necessity as long as someone will tally the score. The person keeping score has to be able to add reliably which lets me out. You can develop some strategies so it is good for adults as you are sitting there sipping your bourbon and chatting.

    6+
    1. Quirkle is great. Scrabble doesn’t work well with my family as the ages range from quite elderly grandma to elementary aged and there are English-as-a-second-language issues for some, so some family members get frustrated a lot because there are such skill level gaps. But everyone can play Quirkle and have a good time.

      Though the current family favorites are Exploding Kittens and Zombie Flux.

      4+
  6. For the longest time, I thought I was a TERRIBLE Scrabble player, and couldn’t figure out why because I have a massive vocabulary. And then I played with a different set of friends, and I mopped up the floor with them. It dawned on me belatedly that perhaps playing (literally) with national champions of the game, and their peers, might have set my expectations wrong. It was also when I realized that competition-level Scrabble was more of a math game than a word game.

    I still play with one of those friends, who’s an absolute sweetie, and he’ll fix my plays, using the same letters I put on the board, but in a way that gives me five times as many points. And then he’ll moan and wail at the end, when the score says I beat him.

    15+
    1. Oh! 😍 I just love everything about this. The underestimated ability, the great victory, the wailing friend – it’s all like a lovely novella.

      10+
  7. Game play was a part of my life. At sea, in our off time, there were backgammon and acey-deucey tournaments, cribbage contests, and card games. At home there were Life, Clue, Sorry!, Monopoly, Scrabble, Yahtzee, and card games. I learned Pinochle and Euchre, Hearts and Spades, Rummy and Cribbage while I was in grammar school, as well as all the usual kid distractions like Go Fish and Crazy 8s and Uno. I learned to play Bridge (badly) after Nuclear Power School in 1971. Does anyone else remember a newspaper column called “Goren on Bridge” that was in every daily paper?

    Now, finding people who want to play anything “boring” like that stuff is very, very hard. Games are computerized. Candy Crush? Some sort of Farm game? Oh, well. There’s still Solitaire and Freecell and Spider, and I have a CD for Hoyle games that still installs under Windows 10. I even had a computerized Scrabble game at one time, but the computer routinely kicked my butt.

    I miss Risk.

    7+
    1. It’s a generation thing. Most baby boomers no longer get together with friends and play games other than cards. My nephews who range in age from 30 to 40 are avid board game players, meeting with friends often to play games. And when the family gets together, one of them has a new game to spring on us. We almost always get a game for Christmas. One nephew always wants to play Rail Baron when he visits since we have a table in the family room where it can be left set up so we can take breaks and do other stuff and still come back for an hour here and there.

      There is a local store called “Cloud Cap” that sells and buys board games and they also rent games so you can try them out before you buy them. Plus they have a game room where gamers get together. I believe there are similar game stores all over the country. I have heard that one of libraries in town has a game night. So maybe your library has a game night. If you are still interested in games, you might check to see if there are any game nights locally beyond the Dungeons and Dragons type of games.

      5+
      1. Thanks, Jessie! I needed the reminder. And my own kinder have been known to gather with their friends on rarer and rarer occasions for D&D or Magic the Gathering. I’m not invited to those – there may have been one too many curmudgeonly reminiscences like, “In my day, there were only three rule books of 44 pages each. Every dungeon didn’t have enough treasure to pay the national debt! And Elves? Let me tell you about elves….”

        8+
          1. I don’t know how to answer this. I played starting in the 70s and for about fifteen years. But D&D and its later iterations were never the only Roll-Playing Games (RPGs) out there, and many of the others are just as good, if not better.

            More, my curmudgeonly reminiscences are not limited to games experienced. I was a published author in the Dragon Magazine. One of my articles was republished in the first “best of” compilation, and even used in the hardback Dragon Compendium (available at Amazon for way too much money). Getting you to spend money on this hobby may be a conflict of interest or something.

            If you do decide to play, find someone who already owns the hundreds of dollars worth of rule books and addenda. Don’t spend anything until you’ve decided whether you like it.

            5+
        1. We played D&D from the beginning. Recently my brother got back into it and joined a group from work and he came back ranting about 1st level characters shouldn’t get superpowers and enchanted weapons. On flip side, when he pulled out his well used, first edition, original rule books, the younger kids all but genuflected.

          8+
          1. We’ve got a family D&D night scheduled for tonight, so I’m brushing up on my Bard jokes (bard? They were terrible!).

            5+
    2. Risk was my brother’s game. I vividly remember the one time I beat him. He was also big on Monopoly. My mother collected all kinds of Monopoly sets that we used to play on.

      At college, a group of us used to hang out in the student center, and depending on the number of available players and their skill, we’d play bridge, or hearts or spades. Double-deck cancellation hearts can be deadly!

      5+
  8. Yay! I love Scrabble. I grew up playing it with my librarian mother (and my sisters) and now play periodically with my best friend. Who, coincidentally, is coming over this afternoon to start work on the garden and then play Scrabble. We play 9-letter Scrabble, which we find much more interesting than regular 7-letter. You can make longer words more often.

    6+
  9. Words with Friends and Word Chums are very similar to Scrabble. I play both but prefer Word Chums. Another game I used to love to play is Balderdash; a game of words and definitions. You need at least 3 people to play it so now that I am on my own, I haven’t played it in several years.

    6+
  10. Scrabble was a huge game in our family. My mother would play with her sisters and cousins. I would never play with them because my scores were so much lower than everyone else’s and I’m a poor loser.

    I like it much better now.

    My kids love to play games, Callan will bring them with her when she comes for holidays and talks the others into playing. It’s so much fun to watch them. But Scrabble isn’t in the list of candidates. I don’t know why we own it. I think they like games with more interaction between players.

    4+
    1. My grammar is not all it should be. I look at the first sentence without the comma and it looks good to me. Why should there be a comma after the why?

      3+
      1. It changes the meaning. Without the comma the sentence means I don’t know why we have this game. With the comma it becomes I don’t know why they don’t play it because we actually have it.

        2+
        1. Okay. I was just assuming the one meaning of “I don’t know why we own it”. I would have probably put a semi-colon after the why for the second meaning instead of a comma since they are both complete sentences. But I don’t know if a semi-colon is correct in this case either.

          3+
  11. My parents and older siblings played Scrabble, but I always lost so it wasn’t much fun for me. In college I learned Palabra, which is sort of a Scrabble with cards, that was a lot of fun.

    3+
  12. I LOVE Scrabble! DF and I got this braille & large letter scrabble board some years ago so everyone can play, and he, MIL and I set up a game every now and then. It’s a lot of fun, although MIL sometimes tries to convince us that some words that aren’t words are actually words (apparently WordFeud allows some really werid things to be words…), so we keep a computer close by to consult Google if we’re unsure 😉

    If I’d known it was Scrabble day a little earlier, I might’ve suggested a game… Bedtime now. Alas.

    5+
  13. I love scrabble and haven’t played it in years. We’re all getting together tomorrow for lunch and for the dogs to play. I might challenge my kids to an afternoon game.

    6+
  14. My family was a Boggle family when I was young and now we have all-evening tournaments of Bananagrams. In between we had a fierce few years of the Victorian game Anagrams, which freaked out some in-laws and we stopped. (In the version of Anagrams we learned, you take words away from other players. Way aggressive compared to the others.)

    5+
  15. I used to play Scrabble a lot as a child. Still have two sets with wood tiles and wood racks.

    2+
  16. My favorite board game is Codename, a word game. I like that you can play it for a short time and that it has variations for only two or three people.

    We had Junior Scrabble and regular Scrabble when I was a kid. I think the Junior version did not survive four children. One of my grandmas was extremely good at Boggle so we learned to be good too.

    1+
  17. In our first two years of marriage, DH and I played Scrabble almost every night. Our rule was that you had to play under a made-up name. Now, when I look at the old score tablets, I can’t even remember which one of us was, say, “The Wizard of Oz” and which one “Out to Lunch.”

    4+
    1. I love this. I don’t know how you came up with it, but it’s hard for one person to take the high (or low) road if you don’t actually know who won! And I love the names too.

      1+
  18. I play Words With Friends, a Scrabble derivative, with a bunch of people. What I especially like about WWF is that there’s a function where you can see if you can score more points. It doesn’t tell you where, so you can go nuts looking for a higher-scoring word. It’s a hoot when you’re playing on your phone with the person right next to you. Sighs abound!

    0
  19. Late comment, I know, but I just had to chime in and say that I love Clue and no one will play with me!

    0
    1. My neighbor brings her 10 year old granddaughter over when they need 4 people to play Clue. The girl is lethal at it and wins and she is playing against 3 adults, 2 with graduate degrees and 1 with two B.A.s and we cut her no slack.

      0
  20. I hated Scrabble as a kid, but there were no adults to play it with so we never learned strategies. Then I was stuck unable to work (waiting for immigration papers) and my mother in law taught me killer Scrabble where we fairly often hit 400 points. Now I play a variant on my phone called Lexulous with friends a distance away. We’ve had a couple hat tricks (three bingos by a single player in a game) and I hit 200 for one bingo once. (It logs in through Facebook and I’m open to more games!) I love Risk but don’t have anyone to play with — it filled weekends at university. Although I’m odd and don’t like the new versions with human soldiers — I can sacrifice much better if I’m just losing plastic bits.

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