Argh Author: Robena Grant’s The Legend of Crying Girl Creek

Our Roben went home to research her latest book: “I enjoyed doing the research on this book, as it required a couple of extra trips to Australia. That’s always fun to catch up with relatives. The setting of the book is only a half hour drive from my mother’s home, and it is where I grew up. The research added some historical details to the story that dated back to the early penal colony, and the convict built Great North Road from Sydney to the Upper Hunter Valley.” The book is The Legend of Crying Girl Creek, and if you act fast, like right now, it’s at a great price.

Adventurous American nurse Samantha Winters is on a study abroad program in Australia. But after one perfect night with a handsome stranger, she finds herself with child. Intrigued with an elderly patient’s tales of a local creek where pregnant women drown themselves, Sam agrees to help end the curse. Historian James Campbell keeps a vigilant watch on his family’s haunted land, hoping to prevent more deaths. A loner in his personal life, he’s stunned to discover his grandmother’s nurse is the one woman he can’t forget. Sam is a believer. James is a skeptic. With the legend’s anniversary looming closer, the two work together to solve the mystery of Crying Girl Creek. Amid the tangles of secrets and lies Sam has a secret of her own: James is the father of her baby. And he doesn’t want children.

You can find out more at Roben’s website, or just go straight to Amazon and hit that buy button.

Questionable: How Do You Show What the PoV Character Doesn’t See?

Sarah asked:
My question is about how to write a book in one PoV only, while still implying someone else’s PoV.   I’ve seen it done (clumsily, I think) in many many books: the PoV MC will say something off-hand to a potential lover (John) and the author writes, “John paused for a moment before replying, as if her remark had hurt him.” That seems to me to be cheating: the PoV MC is meant to be oblivious of John’s real feelings at this point, but the author shows us the card anyway. How blatant do I need to be in using the PoV MC to reveal someone else’s feelings? I know I need to a bit, but I’m struggling between clumsy (as above) and so subtle no one else gets it. 

S

Unless you’re writing in third omniscient, you only get one point of view, no implying others. So let’s review PoV first, then I’ll answer your specific question. There are four PoVs to choose from: first person, second person (don’t pick that one), third person omniscient and third person limited.

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