Argh Author: Kelly Sattler’s We Can Do It: Women in Library Information Technology

Our Kelly S has co-edited a book on women librarians who find stuff for you, a career dear to my heart since The Desk Set.  Of course, We Can Do It: Women in Library Information Technology a lot more than that; check out this description:

“Does gender play a role in library information technology (IT)? For the last several decades, libraries have primarily employed women, whereas IT jobs have been held by men. What happens when the two collide? What is it like for women who are working for IT within the library? Has it changed over time? Through personal narratives, we explore these questions and seek to provide guidance and encouragement for women and men in library IT, those pursuing a career in library IT, and library management. The collection includes themes concerning “Imposter Syndrome,” career trajectory, experiences of sexism and biases. Contributors also offer advice and encouragement to those entering or already in the field. Examples of positions held by the contributors include managers, web developers, system librarians, programmers, and consultants. This collection provides a voice for women in library IT, bringing their experiences from the margins to the center, and encouraging conversation for positive change.”

You can buy Kelly’s book here on Amazon,

or go here to learn more about it and Kelly’s career, which is amazing.

26 thoughts on “Argh Author: Kelly Sattler’s We Can Do It: Women in Library Information Technology

  1. Okay, I published this by accident because I’m working with WordPress’s new text editor which is a real PITA, but it’s good stuff so what the hell, two posts on Wednesday. Also, check out what Kelly does for a living: SO COOL.

    Yes, I know the layout sucks. NEW TEXT EDITOR. Bleah.

    4+
  2. Wow, Kelly S. This book sounds fascinating. The Amazon link isn’t showing the Search Inside first chapter thing–anywhere the first chapter is posted? Am interested for myself but also for my niece who is studying engineering but also a bookwork who vacillated between a career related to books or one in engineering. Think she may find your perspectives insightful.

    2+
    1. Hi KatyL,

      Sorry, as far as I know none of it is posted for sampling. In truth, it wouldn’t be fair to the reader to do so. The book is a collection of essays written by nearly 40 authors. So, if you read one and liked it, you might read the next one and not like it. However, I could see the value in enabling people to read the table of contents. It would like the titles and the hashtags assigned to the essays. I’ll see if I can find a way to share that.

      2+
      1. A Table of Contents is just what I was going to ask for. Thanks! The title and description sound terrific….

        1+
      2. Thanks, Kelly. Table of contents would be good. But really, even in compilations there’s often an intro or something that can help, too. Good luck with it:)

        0
  3. Hmm, I just left a comment but it appears lost. Perhaps because I used my full name? I am having to sign in again.

    0
  4. Librarians rock. My mother was a librarian, then a library director, then worked fairly high up in the NYS Library system. I literally grew up in libraries. Librarians are my heroes. (Heroines.)

    4+
    1. I too have an MLS, although I took a lot of information science classes as part of the coursework, and landed a job with a library software company. So, now I train librarians how to use the software, and trouble shoot their issues when they have any. It’s a pretty good feeling to be able to help a librarian to help a patron.

      3+
  5. I have an essay in this book and I’m totally nerding out that it’s mentioned on this blog! Thanks for promoting it.

    4+
    1. Tara’s entry is titled “Emotional labor: The Unexpected Hard Work” and the hashtags associated with it are #Challenges #EmotionalLabor

      2+
  6. And I just posted a request to my local library to buy it. A reference librarian recently tracked down a book title that I couldn’t recall, by an author I hadn’t really noticed very clearly, that I wanted to check out again or recommend to a friend. I was such a fuzzy person, presenting her with a fuzzy problem, and my library system’s computer database can find best sellers if you type the title EXACTLY as it is, but not much else. I am hoping someone will improve it if they read Kelly’s book.

    Thanks so much for the recco and the link!

    2+
      1. Great article! I am reminded of Smart Bitches Trashy Books #habo posts – help a bitch out – where people can submit vague romance plots and others pitch in to help figure out title and author.

        1+
  7. This is so cool! Thank you Kelly (and Jenny)! I’m a retired law librarian and am impressed with the generations of librarians who followed me (MLS ’87). It’s a different profession from the one I entered and exited but no less exciting.

    I should really say “professions.” The opportunities are limitless for those with the skills and aptitude of professional librarians who have been “called” to the profession (see also the “Sacred Stacks,” by Nancy Maxwell). I’ve often thought the study of library science was as useful as the study of liberal arts and law. We can find anything, organize anything, and solve anything – almost 🙂

    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.