Cherry Saturday, July 21, 2018


Today is National Junk Food Day.

I object to the term “Junk Food.”  Okay granted, if a food is 90% sugar, salt or fat (or 90% sugar, salt, AND fat), it’s probably junk, but a lot of perfectly good food gets lumped under the Junk Food label.  Like Krispy Kremes.  Okay, probably not those.  Or Big Macs.  Okay, not those either.  Or Snickers ice cream bars–  okay, no, not them, but how about french fries; they’re a vegetable.

You know, you probably shouldn’t eat junk food.

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54 thoughts on “Cherry Saturday, July 21, 2018

  1. Y’all, I have such good stuff for Working Wednesday!

    My worst food sin is eating buttered bread rolls… white bread rolls. Its a perfect filler for when I’m hungry but can’t stop to make a real sandwich, which is sometimes four times a week or more. I can’t eat brown ones, which is weird because I only eat brown bread.

    I also love baguettes, tortillas, ciabatta, naan, chapattis, and croissants. Sigh. I like carbs.

    15+
  2. I have more of a “fat tooth” than a “sweet tooth,” so my weakness is cheese. Somewhere in a box in the basement, I have a virtually unused copy of “The Joy of Cooking,” and I believe it was in there that cheese was described as “milk’s leap to immortality.”

    11+
    1. I should’ve said try it only if you want to. I’ve been looking into trying the “keto” diet and after figuring out how few carbs I would be allowed, I have high doubts as to whether I could ever do it. At most, I was to allow 21g of (net) carbs a day.

      I drink a tablespoon of tart cherry juice a day to ward off headaches. (It really seems to work on killing the small, dull, little headaches I was having daily.) That tablespoon costs me 9g of carbs – nearly half of the entire days worth of carbs and I’m not giving it up.

      So if you do try it, I would love to hear how it goes for you.

      3+
    2. Cheese is definitely a “milk’s leap to immortality.” There was a children’s musical in Russia in the 1980s, based on Treasure Island by Stevenson. In that musical, someone was left on an uninhabited island alone. He survived, but one of his arias (a very memorable one with a catchy tune) was about his craving for a piece of cheese. It was my favorite in the whole musical. I would’ve felt the same. Can’t live without cheese.

      7+
  3. My walking-and-talking-and-eating-nice-things-friend proclaims chocolate a vegetable. “It grows on trees, which means it’s either a fruit or a vegetable, which means it’s healthy. Period.”

    Fiancé is more on the line: “Everything that’s good is unhealthy, and when I eat I want to eat things I like, so screw healthy if it can’t behave like junkfood and taste nice.”

    I don’t know. Not a junkfood person as such, but have become increasingly lazy when faced with the task to cook this last year, so we’ve had more junkfood than I would actually prefer because we can order it and nobody has to cook. Fiancé has problems with eating/swallowing (it’s psychological) so what we basically eat 600 times per week is chicken and various variations of minced meat (meatballs, hamburgers, pasta sauce etc) because that’s easier for him to eat. Downside: splitting the dinner week between chicken and minced meat has made me rather sick of both of them…which makes junkfood sound very good indeed. Like Sushi. Mmm. But THAT is healthy, right? 😉

    But it’s too hot to eat (or cook) anyway – can I have ice cream instead? 😉

    5+
    1. Chocolate (the real stuff) is actually a veg. I have a good hot chocolate that has 4 g of fiber in a 3 tablespoon serving. (I don’t use that much, but still.) When my mother said, “Eat your beans,” I’m sure that’s what she had in mind.

      10+
  4. Sort of OT: In my perusal of serious seed catalogues (Stokes) I discovered that some vegetable seeds are described as having the “sweetness” gene. I don’t think this is considered genetically modified but more hybridization. It started about 20 -25 years ago. This is probably why carrots or corn no longer seem to lose their sweetness a few days after they are picked. And broccoli seems to taste sweeter than it did 50 years ago.

    Way to go, plant scientists.

    5+
    1. Except that I think they’re taking it too far. I don’t like my potatoes or tomatoes to be too sweet, for example. And, of course, the more you get used to sweet things, the sweeter you want everything to be: not a good thing.

      4+
      1. After I was diagnosed as diabetic, I started looked at sugar content on labels. Ye gods, they put sugar in EVERYTHING now.
        Now it’s salt. Basically, I’m cooking from scratch, reading nutrition guides from restaurants, or starving. I say, “Don’t salt anything” a lot in restaurants.

        7+
        1. I love salt. But I understand that, like sugar, you can train yourself to like less of it. I know when I’ve managed to do that with sugar, it becomes difficult to eat anything ready-made – it all tastes so sickly.

          3+
          1. That’s what I’m hoping. I have a salt pig on the stove so I can cook with scant pinches; it’s too easy to go nuts with a shaker.

            3+
          2. I was retaining water for a while and had to reduce my sodium intake. After a while, maybe 1-3 months, my taste buds adjusted to the new levels and became much more acute, at least regarding salt. I also got a copy of’ Craig Claiborne’s Gourmet Diet by Craig Claiborne and Pierre Franey. It had some great ideas for seasoning without salt. I believe that the book is now out of print, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find a used copy

            3+
        2. When I cook at home (most of the time) I use small amounts of salt. I find all prepared foods and most foods in restaurants to be WAY too salty for my tastes. Sometimes to the point of being inedible.

          And yes, sugar in everything. I used to eat the cheap “caviar” (with black dye) from the grocery store. Picked some up the other day and it has sugar in it now. UGH.

          0
        3. I get the Cajun Ribeye at Ruby Tuesday, with grilled zucchini and broccoli on the sides, with tea or diet coke. Around 800 calories, 800 mg of sodium. Leaves me 700 mg of sodium for the rest of the day, which means grilled tuna steaks or fillets and brown rice. My limit is 1500 mg per day – what’s yours?

          0
          1. I think it’s 2000, but nobody’s ever told me, so I just stay under that. It helps that I do a lot of home cooking where I just don’t add salt. They closed the only Ruby Tuesday around here, but then I live in the middle of nowhere. Applebee’s is Fine Dining.

            0
      2. I keep reading about tomato varieties that are supposed to be less acid and sweeter and I think “Why? Why grow a tomato that doesn’t taste like a tomato?” One of my many great uncles grew some low-acid tomatoes in the sixties, because he was trying to reduce acid in his diet, and the rest of the family responded “But Jack! They don’t taste good!”

        6+
        1. The other problem with sweeter tomatoes is it makes it tougher to can them. Modern instructions include adding lemon juice to make them acidic enough. Yeesh. Heirloom varieties are nicer.

          3+
  5. I don’t eat much fast food, but I’m aware of how we lable things. When I’m actively trying to drop a few pounds I do a once a week treat day. Not cheat day. It works for me.

    6+
  6. I think we had a junk food supper one night this week when my husband made a Tortilla Pie with all kinds of goodness between the tortilla layers. A light chili mix made with a filling of tomatoes, hamburg, onions, garlic, salsa, beans, corn and cheese. Baked in the oven like a lasagna. On the side were sour cream, guacamole and fresh salsa. Burp.

    5+
    1. I don’t think that’s junk food. Junk food has little or no nutritional value, and that sounds really nutritious.

      8+
    2. Peg Bracken published The I Hate to Cook Book in 1960 with a tortilla pie called Pedro’s Special that was very similar to this. It was very easy to make. And very good. This cookbook saw me through college and my first years of marriage and my first serious job (which were concurrent).

      And as a new cook (except for my experience as a fry cook), it basically taught me how to get through having a dinner on the table every night that did not call for knowing a lot about what I was doing. It was the start of a cook book collection that now is in the hundreds. My original “I Hate to Cook Book” was a second-hand paperback and when it fell apart, my husband bought me a signed, hardcover, first edition.

      The chapter headings are great: “30 day-by-day entrees or The rock pile”, “The Left Over or Every Family Needs a Dog”, “Potluck Suppers or How to bring the water for the lemonade”. Since it was the 60’s, she did not hesitate to encourage you to use onion soup mix, or canned tomatoes, or canned beans.

      This is how we ate back in the day before supermarkets had deli counters and we could not go out to restaurants or buy fast food but had to count every penny to pay back the college loans so we could go into debt to buy our first house and live the American Dream.

      Excuse me while I go look for my snow shoes that I wore to walk 10 miles through a raging blizzard to go to school.

      16+
      1. I loved that cookbook back in the day. Must go see if I can find it again, just for nostalgia.

        7+
      2. My mom had that cookbook. Pedro Casserole was a family favorite. And the Elevator Lady Spice Cookies are delicious too.

        2+
      3. I found a copy of this book in a Little Free Library and have been reading it with interest. It’s like a time capsule about food!

        2+
  7. French fries are considered a vegetable in the American public school system. At least, that was what was broadcasted on a Jamie Oliver reality tv show. I think he was out the most unhealthiest city in America based on someone’s statistics. I only caught one episode. It took place mostly in a school for that episode and it was mentioned that french fries were classified as a vegetable. It was also sad that none of the first graders could actually identify a potato or really any vegetable.

    3+
    1. Wasn’t that the series where he (for contrast) offered French primary school kids junk food and fizzy soft drinks, and they politely tried them and then refused any more?

      2+
      1. My brother’s kids grew up in France where their Mother had an amazing garden and grew everything short of sweet corn. By high school, one kid was a vegetarian and one never saw a form of junk food he didn’t love. And I can’t forget the taste of the tomatoes Diana grew.

        3+
      1. He tried. He failed. It was so ludicrous that it helped advocates save the school lunch program.

        1+
  8. I don’t actually like most “junk food.” Even the potato chips I’m addicted to have some fiber and protein in them, and are non-GMO. Also, made in Saratoga, which is about 2 hours from my house, so I get to count it as locally made 🙂

    2+
  9. I LOVE junk food. But I am picky – salt and pepper potato chips. Salt and vinegar potato chips. Truffle fries. A good hamburger. Good pizza. Dark chocolate. Dark chocolate icecream with sea salt sprinkled on top.

    Although I’m realizing some of my favorite unhealthy foods are not actually fast food – raspberry pie, macaroni and cheese, tiramisu, lasagna. I love junk food, but I think I like comfort food more.

    I finally had to cut myself off from having chips at home. I’ll try introducing them again once I’ve broken the habit. Or maybe I won’t miss them. I’ve been using healthy (ish) kettle corn as my substitute snack, and it’s working so far.

    5+
  10. Salt and vinegar chips are one of the few things I can’t have in the house. I open a huge bag, I eat the whole thing. I take them to parties as a treat because that way other people eat some of the bag.

    We eat too much junk food. The husband keeps buying biscuits (cookies for you Americans) and we both buy chocolate. And I’ll pick up takeaways at least once a week, because I just don’t have the energy to cook after work.

    I’m amazed America has a national junk food day. Who on earth dreamed that one up, let alone got enough agreement for it? There’d be an uproar here.

    3+
    1. I don’t think anybody agreed, I think somebody just said, “Today is Junk Food Day” and there it was.

      0
  11. Had I only realized it was junk food day, I wouldn’t have walked past that Krispy Kreme store this morning.

    I did have a Reuben and a root-beer float for lunch. Do either of those count?

    3+
    1. I don’t think a Reuben can count as health food in any one’s calculation just for the fats and salt. But they are so tasty. I did have one that didn’t have the thousand island dressing and was not grilled in butter and really what was the point?

      1+
  12. Yesterday I ate a bag of twizzlers. And afterwards felt guilty for having no control. Ah well. Love salt and vinegar potatoes chips. Can’t buy them. When under stress I eat “mindlessly” on chips or go on an eating jag of toast and honey even though we eat healthy foods, little or no salt and sugar.

    While cooking dinner this evening I decided we should eat all plant based food one or two days a week.

    2+
  13. For dinner: small amount of home-made potato salad, avocado toast — with bacon. Yay, I qualify to celebrate Junk Food Day! Barely.

    0
  14. My niece and her nearly 3-year-old and their new puppy are coming to visit today. I checked online for foods to serve the kid. So I’ll offer him veggie sticks and homemade chicken nuggets. Ho hum.

    I found something cool from Australia: fairy bread. It’s buttered white bread covered with little sprinkles (the round balls: nonpareils, Aussie’s call them 100s and 1000s).

    Gonna try those.

    1+
  15. A day late, but I ate two frozen Milky Way Bars for lunch. (not the ice cream ones the candy bar. I love frozen candy bars.) But now my jaw hurts.

    And no, neither of my health conditions is conducive to eating candy for lunch. Every so often I go totally off the rails. Then I reevaluate and start over. I’m good with that.

    6+
  16. I had the most amazing deep fried cheese curds on Saturday. They were lightly floured/breaded and used a white cheese – probably the house made mozzarella.

    Previously, I’ve had Culver’s deep fried cheese curds which I and my kids thought were pretty nasty.

    I live in Wisconsin, the land of cows, cheese and lushes. Cheese curds are the bits of cheese that get trimmed off the the blocks of cheese. Best when eaten fresh and before they’ve ever been refrigerated. They squeak when you eat them at room temperature! I don’t know how easy they are to get outside of Wisconsin though.

    0
  17. I don’t think I’m living up to the spirit of junk food day.

    Breakfast was (just plain, original) Cheerios with a sprinkle of Stevia and a splash of 2% chocolate milk. Then some Russell Stover’s Sugar Free chocolate miniatures (1 serving).

    Lunch was a boneless chicken breast broiled with a small red potato (62 grams – small!). Then some Russell Stover’s Sugar Free chocolate miniatures (1 serving).

    Dinner won’t be for another hour yet, after 8 EDT. So there was a snack, a small salad with a broiled flounder fillet. Then some Russell Stover’s Sugar Free chocolate miniatures (1 serving).

    I’m up to 629 calories, 62 grams of carbs (net), and 802 mg of sodium. (Yes, I use a Microsoft Access database to monitor everything, e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g that goes in my face.)

    My dinner plan is a Walmart bag-o-salad, 100 calories and mg of sodium, with a fresh tomato, two slices of pre-cooked chicken bacon, some zucchini slices, some spring onion, to which I may or mayn’t add some store bought ranch dressing. More likely I’ll sprinkle it with apple cider vinegar. Then some Russell Stover’s Sugar Free chocolate miniatures (1 serving).

    Before bed, I may have some Russell Stover’s Sugar Free chocolate miniatures (1 serving). Oh, and I’ll be drinking tea, Earl Grey, hot, decaf throughout.

    0

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