16 thoughts on “Cherry Saturday, November 11, 2017

  1. I had never heard of the book sculptures of Edinburgh but feel as if I have been let in to a special secret, now that I do.

    I bought one of those origami book plus paper kits that come in boxes. Looks like the book was written by people who are expert origami-ists but poor teachers. They left out the very intuitive/basic steps making it difficult to execute.

    Like when you eat something lovely at someone’s house and they give you the recipe but are so used to making that item, that they forget to tell you about something they do but is not written down. Deep breath.

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    1. YouTube is very hit or miss, for everything, but I have found that if I’m having trouble with directions for a craft and wish I could just see someone else do it, YouTube can be a godsend! I did a whole paper flower craft with my 10th graders this week thanks to a bunch of YouTube tutorials on how to do spiral flowers! (I also burned the heck out of my fingers with a hot glue gun… Should’ve taken that suggestion of spray glue in one of the videos more seriously!)

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    2. A friend I follow on tumblr often does origami figures, and he claims that nearly every set of instructions has at least one step that is basically “Do Some Magic.” XD But yes, it’s so easy to leave out some step in the instructions for anything because it’s so obvious to you that you don’t even think about it, much less realize that it’s not obvious to people with different experiences. Did anyone else have to do the “How to Make a Peanut Butter Sandwich” essay in grade school, where the teacher then made sandwiches in front of the class following your paper’s instructions as literally as possible?

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  2. I had heard of these but forgotten about them. Thanks for the reminder; I enjoyed reading the story and looking at the photos a again.

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  3. Oh my goodness. Love this! Especially fitting since my son and I are making miniatures for Christmas from cereal boxes. Perfect.

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  4. Once I got past the “you did WHAT to books?” I really enjoyed these – I forget there are so many books published, and either unread or old, or out of date, this could count as extraordinary levels of recycling!

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    1. I’ve just been reading the history of the paper sculptures, the artist was a woman. In total 10 sculptures. Then another was found 11/10, called the epilogue, the street scene. Thank you, again.

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  5. When I was growing up, eighty percent of the books I read came from the library, and my parents were really strict about book manners. No dog-earing, no writing in books, etc. (-: It was a very interesting few months when I started college, and really needed to write in my books. It helped a lot that many of my books were used, and pre-marked. Made it kind of OK.

    These sculptures are really, really beautiful, but some part of me still worries about knowledge lost forever.

    Still, there’s also a very important message in here that books aren’t the only thing in life — they are supposed to be a tool, and a conduit to a greater creativity. And that sometimes we have to destroy the book in order to bring something new out of the ashes.

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  6. As others have said eloquently, cutting a book to make anything — even art — seems repugnant to me. At the same time, I live in a world where books are constantly destroyed, so in fact cutting books could be seen as reform-ing them so they can continue to exist.

    In the Scottish example, I suspect the cut books had a lot to do with Ian Rankin, not that Rankin knew what was going on. For instance, Confessions of a Justified Sinner is a great background for Rankin’s redemptive tales. I like his protagonist John Rebus, especially in the later books. The thicker books are far better than the thinner ones.

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