It’s Thursday and This is a Good Book

So thanks to all of you, I have been reading up a storm lately and not watching TV at all.  Weird.  I’ve been doing series–the Lockwood books were a lot of fun, the Myron Vale books were not–in between looking at my own book with new eyes.  The best news, though, is that Michael Sheen and David Tennant are starring in Amazon’s six-episode mini-series of Good Omens.  OMG, when that comes out, I’m goin’ back to TV.  (Actually, I’ll be back when Legends returns in October, but definitely for Good Omens.)  

In the meantime, I’m sitting in front of a fan with a dachshund lying on his back beside me.  No parasol, though.  So what good book have you read this week? 

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Bujold Does It Again


The fabulous Lois McMaster Bujold is discussing her latest novella, “Penric’s Fox,” with the fabulous Eight Ladies Writing right now.  From our Micki:

“Lois McMaster Bujold’s new novella, “Penric’s Fox” came out last Tuesday, and she’s agreed to answer three questions about writing it for the Eight Ladies Writing Blog (August 12, 2017: Michaeline: Lois McMaster Bujold and Three Questions About Writing “Penric’s Fox”). I hope you’ll come over to see what she has to say about process. The new novella is the third in the Penric series, but the fifth she’s completed, which I found fascinating. How does a writer write out of order like that? It’s all about writing what wants to come next.”

You cannot go wrong with Bujold, or with the Eight Ladies, for that matter.  Go check it out.

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Cherry Saturday August 12, 2017

Today is World Elephant Day.

The elephant is white because it’s also Garage Sale Day.

I did look up images for “garage sale,” but they looked too much like my present garage to be anything but depressing.

So let’s have an internet white elephant swap.  What totally useless thing will you give up from your house?  (I’ll have to think about it.  The selection here is wide.)

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Bookending Nita

I’ve often said that you can’t write a first scene until you’ve written the last scene, at least not a final write.  You have to know where you’re going to know where to start from, know what happens in the final scene to introduce it in the first scene.  So now that I’ve written the final scene (not finished the book, I just wrote that scene), I can go back to the first scene and do some of the massive cutting and shaping it needs.  I’m looking at it in several ways, but the one that’s most crucial, I think, is seeing how it  bookends..  

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