Ben Aaronovitch and the Rivers of London

Suppose you’re a new constable in the London police force, one Peter Grant, and suppose you’re at the scene of a horrific murder, and suppose you run into the only witness, and suppose that witness is a ghost. Reporting that leads to you becoming attached to the heretofore secret branch of the Met for supernatural crime, manned by one very old inspector named Nightingale (born 1900), who doesn’t look a day over sixty and appears to be getting younger, and moving into the old mansion that houses that supernatural branch where you’re taken care of by a hollow-eyed, black-haired housekeeper named Molly who has too many teeth and a taste for red meat and where you learn that all the waterways of London have their own goddesses, including the dangerous Lady Tyburn and the impudent Beverley Brook.

That’s the start of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London series that includes six novels (so far), a novella, and a series of graphic novels. It’s not Harry Potter for adults, it’s much more than that as it draws on history and mythology and sociology and computer science, so maybe it’s for Harry Potter fans who thought the books would have been better with more sex, violence, diversity (Peter’s mixed race), and in-depth discussion about the practical theory of magic. There’s some X-Files in there, too, and a dash of Supernatural, but mostly the Rivers novels are their own things, endlessly inventive and compelling.   The stories are always complex, which means that I need to reread each one to completely understand what’s going on, but that’s okay because they give me a marvelous world full of fascinating characters I always want to read again.

However, if you want your Big Bad defeated, you’re going to get frustrated because there are several of them, and they’re still roaming around free at the end of the sixth novel. I think there’s a limit to how long this battle can be stretched out—Peter does solve each mystery in each book, he just can’t catch the bad guy—so I’m hoping it gets resolved in the next novel, whenever that comes out.   The novella is excellent if unsatisfying—it reads like an unfinished novel with an abrupt finish—and the graphic novels are not good. But the novels are damn good reads.

Therefore, I highly recommend the Rivers of London. And right now, Midnight Riot is $.99 on Amazon, probably because they know if you read one, you’ll go head first into all of them.

Midnight Riot in US/Rivers of London in UK, 2011:
Peter meets a ghost and Nightingale and Molly and rescues a dog, Toby, and tangles with the beautiful Beverly and the dangerous Lady Ty, while working with Lesley, a fellow officer, to solve supernatural murders. One of the most intricate and convoluted plots I’ve ever read—I really didn’t understand half of it until I read it again, didn’t get some of the rest of it until the third time, and I’ll probably grasp more the fourth time—it’s still a great story with a wonderful protagonist and an antagonist like no other. The world-building is marvelous, not just establishing modern London but also the intricate social structure of the supernatural world, especially the Thames family, aka the warring Rivers of London, and the different magic spells and rules that the very special branch is armed with.   (It’s helpful if you’re familiar with Punch and Judy shows, too.) The ending is brutal, but the sense of justice is strong.

Moon over Soho, 2011:
Peter gets entangled with a jazz-loving woman named Simone and spends a good chunk of the book naked with her, which made me think less of him because there was nothing about her that was intelligent or interesting (until the end), and nothing about their relationship that was anything but sex, but that may be because I’m a hetero woman; a cheerful, pastry-loving sex addict is probably many readers’ idea of a good time. But he’s also trying to help Lesley in the aftermath of the last book, and he’s still dealing with the Rivers of London, those gods and goddesses of the waterways, and the crimes are once again complex and never boring. Plus this time, his mom and dad are involved, which means jazz. Even Simone is crucial in the end, so I’ll stop complaining about her.   Also good: the introduction of a series heavy who’s a real bastard: the Faceless Man.  

Whispers Underground, 2012:
A young man is killed in the Underground, and Peter and the rest have to go down even farther, this time into the sewers, to discover who killed him, while still chasing the Faceless Man from the last book. A minor subplot is the most fun: Abigail, a thirteen-year-old girl with attitude who lives in the same housing block at Peter’s mother, tells him there’s a ghost on the train tracks.   Abigail isn’t impressed by anyone, but at the end, she agrees to help out with unseeable that she can see, setting up a great new addition to the Folly Team.

Broken Homes, 2014:
Something odd is happening in a housing project with a very strange design, and Peter and Lesley and Nightingale and the hijab-wearing Officer Sahra Guleeb are on the case, which involves strange deaths, stolen magic books, a tree nymph, and a lot of explosions, the biggest one at the climax. The usual great cast of supporting characters and evil antagonists are present and accounted for, and Peter faces down the Faceless Man at the end. Needs more Abigail, but otherwise great.
 
Foxglove Summer,
2015:

Two elementary schoolgirls go missing in the country and Peter is sent down to help find out why. I think one of the reasons I like this book the least is because it’s untethered from the core group; Peter makes new friends and Beverley Brook shows up, always a good thing, but the Folly family is shattered, and the solution to the mystery this time is so far out that even though the characterizations are once again excellent, the plot seems weak, especially given an ending that comes out of left field, making no sense given the logic of world, and ends so abruptly that I was surprised when I turned the page to see there was no more left   I’ll stick with the series, it’s too good not to, but this wasn’t great. Also the Big Bads who are still wandering around from the last three books? Must be taking a vacation since all they do is text. 

Body Work, 2015, and Night Witch, 2016 (Graphic Novels) 
I had once thought about doing a novel (or two) and then doing the sequels as graphic novels. These two graphic novels convinced me not to do this for a many reasons, but the big one is that you don’t switch genres in the middle of a series without seriously screwing with reader attachment. This is not the way I see these people looking or moving, so it feels to me like an imposter story. Add to that, the stories are weak, the art is not good, and neither of these uses the graphic novel format as its own language; instead they’re just illustrated short stories. I won’t be buying any more (there are other collections), and they don’t seem to be necessary to understand the novels. 

The Hanging Tree, January 2017
Lady Ty calls in a promise and Peter and Nightingale get involved with a simple drug overdose that quickly becomes The Big Bad is Back, which means it’s not that damn simple. No Abigail, which is just wrong, but enough Beverley and Guleed and even more new characters I’d like to see again to bring me back for the next one. By this point, the Rivers books have built a complete and coherent world, populated by wonderful characters, even if the plots require re-reading to figure it all out.

“The Furthest Station” (novella) June 2017
Ghosts, kidnapping, a baby river god, and Abigail in a major role at last. The only drawback is that it’s much too short and ends much too abruptly.

Seriously, if you like mysteries with some scientific supernatural thrown in, read The Rivers of London books.  

 

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52 thoughts on “Ben Aaronovitch and the Rivers of London

  1. Appreciate the critique, sounds great for *that* audience. Too attached to reality here to enjoy the supra. However, may try on theory never hurts to, you know, be open-minded.

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  2. I’ve read the first three or four. I like them, and I’ve been meaning to get back to them, but I just haven’t. I do recommend them to other people.

    The biggest impression I take away from book two is frustration with the song. I didn’t know it, and when I looked it up on YouTube, I wasn’t that impressed. I guess I’d been imagining a much better, richer song . . . the hazards of the digital age, I guess. I didn’t like Peter “cheating” on Leslie/Lesley, either, although I could make some excuses. Peter is still a very young man, exploring what it means to be in a relationship, and what his requirements are for a life partner. Forgivable. (-: But not the sort of scenario you’d usually see in a romance genre novel unless Peter was the Dumped Boy.

    I love the characters, and I loved the Folly. I thought he didn’t really do enough with it in the first few books, and I’m sad to hear that the Folly family got split up. Well, that’s what happens to young men and often young women too — they make a “family” and then they are split up by circumstances (firing, education, moves) and have to form a new family.

    The other thing I love is hearing Peter’s viewpoint as a bi-cultural kid. I’ve got two bi-cultural kids, myself, and it’s just so fun. (-: Not sobering at all.

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    1. Peter was never in a relationship with Leslie. She was on the Force with him and worked with him, but they weren’t sleeping together. He’d have been all for it, but she never gave him any encouragement, so he never made his move. Given that they weren’t sleeping together or even dating, and that Leslie was by that time encouraging him to pursue Beverley, I’ll argue he was free to do whatever and whomever he wanted. The song, “Body and Soul,” is a jazz classic, so that’s just a matter of taste, I think, but Peter wasn’t cheating.

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      1. You are right, he wasn’t cheating. But I was sure they were going to wind up together after a few obstacles. From what I hear from future books, I was really, really wrong. I haven’t gotten that far yet, and that’s part of the reason why I don’t pick up again. I don’t want to accidentally spoil anything, so I’ll stop with that.

        Seeing your good review of The Hanging Tree gives me some incentive to get back. I think the last book I read was Broken Homes, so I need to get over the “dark midnight” of the series, I guess.

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        1. I wondered if they would except she was so completely uninterested, and he reported their interactions that way. If he’d ever gotten even an eyelash thrown his way, he’d have suggested it. It’s one of the reasons I liked Peter. He was really physically attracted to her, but she wasn’t interested, so it stopped there. Plus he treated her as an absolute equal, and had no probably saying that she was better at some things than he was. I thought it was a great platonic relationship. And then came Simone and Beverley . . .

          I can see why Broken Homes would be a deal-breaker if you were invested in a Peter-Leslie relationship. We ran into the same problem with Wild Ride: we did not make it clear enough that Ethan and Mab were never going to be together so people invested in them from the beginning. HUGE mistake.

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          1. I thought it was pretty clear about Ethan and Mab, they were not for each other. I guess the rules of the genre can lead us to assume how things will go. I liked who they ended up with. And I always crave ice cream when I read the book.

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          2. It’s that contract with the reader thing: if the reader perceived a contract and it’s not fulfilled, she’s disappointed.
            Which is why those opening pages are so damn important.

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          3. I also thought it was pretty clear. Especially since they’re uh…Luke and Leia-ish.

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          4. Well, that’s the thing. In a rich and layered book that shows instead of tells, the reader is going to participate and take what she likes from it. I kept seeing hints of “I’m too focused on my professional stuff right now, but all it would take is one late night over chicken tikka and beers in the right circumstances to give Peter a chance, because he’s a good guy.”

            On the other hand, there were definitely strong signs that Peter is too young to commit (and so is Leslie/Lesley for that matter), and it could be a great buddy relationship. You know, like an idealized version of the Detective and the Secretary (only the Secretary is stronger, smarter and has more pull in the department), where there’s a certain attraction, but nobody’s going to mess up a good working relationship for mere sex and giggles. (And ideally, in the last book, they discover they were Meant For Each Other all along.)

            There’s really not much an author can do about every single reader’s baggage and previous reading history.

            On a different tangent, I’ve got to admit something: for half the book, I thought the jazz classic was “Heart and Soul” — you know, that corny but lovely and innocent four-hand piano piece. My mom taught it to me, even though neither of us really played the piano. Finally stopping in the middle of the book to look up “Body and Soul” because I was so confused. From what I read, Ben knows a lot more about jazz than I do, so I’m sure B&S was perfect for the book, but I was grumpy.

            Don’t let my minor whinges stop anyone from trying the books! Try them! Try the Look Inside feature at the book shops, and if you like it, buy them! For all my complaints, I’ve read the first one at least three times (and I think I’ve got it in both the US and UK versions). Pretty good value for the money and time spent.

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          5. I think I’ve read the first one at least three times. There’s so much in there. And all the rest at least twice.

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  3. I’m interested in this series, but at the same time have heard enough (including here) about future books to make me think that I’m not committed to paying for it yet. I read the first book and liked it but at this point would rather try another book or two at the library first.

    You know what? I think any series book where you have the hero/heroine as part of a family/chosen family and then you separate them for the course of (most of) a book, that book usually ends up being the weakest. For example, I loved the Kitty Norville series, but the worst book of it was the book where Kitty was all alone and trapped in a mountain with horrible horrible people. Why was it the worst? Because she was all alone and trapped with horrible people I did not want to read about, missing her cool supportive friends and family. Ugh.

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    1. Yep, the Folly is crucial, it’s Home Base. The other books are all set in London (as I remember) and Aaronovitch does such a wonderful job talking about London that you really miss it when Peter sets out for the countryside. He keeps most of the family-you-make/team together, and he carefully adds new people to the mix, most of whom aren’t completely trustworthy but are necessary. Abigail is a great addition, and then there are all the other people on the police force that he works with that reoccur. The big betrayal at the end of the third book is earned, so I’m all right with that. It was the kidnapping in the country that left me so cold that I almost didn’t go back. Very glad I did, though.

      I think the key to separating a character from the family/team is to keep those lines open. I loved the Leverage Broken Wing Job, where Parker is alone and has to stop a kidnapping with a broken leg, but she kept talking to the others on the phone all the way through. The two where they split the team in two, though, didn’t work as well for me. I liked seeing Nate and Sophie together as a commmited couple, doing the Nick and Nora thing, and I like seeing the kids doing the trio thing to stop a terrorist attack, but it just wasn’t the same without having them together.

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  4. Frankly most books are better with more sex and diversity. Hahaha.

    At current exchange rates 99cents seem ok for me. I thank you for fair warning of lack of villain resolution. I’d get a bit mad if I read it and found there wasn’t a neat ending.

    Next vital question: are they written in first person or third?

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  5. For anyone who’s on the fence about the books, get them in audio. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is BRILLIANT. I much prefer the audio versions to the print versions, and I’m not that big an audio fan generally.

    Also, I’m really annoyed with the novella. Now, I was in a bad mood when I read it, and I was (still am) experiencing a great deal of spinal pain, which may have something to do with it, but the copy-editing is atrocious for something that was professionally published, so I kept getting thrown out of the story. At a guess, I’d say there’s an error on Every. Single. Page. Sometimes several on a single page. Starting with the first page where, I forget, either a word is missing in a sentence or it’s duplicated. And then there’s phenomena instead of phenomenon (where the context is clearly singular), dumping sights instead of sites (and it’s correct later on), several subject-verb errors, more missing/duplicated words in sentences. And shouldn’t it be FArthest Station, not FUrthest?

    Oh, and don’t forget the other novella, which I did like, perhaps because I got it in audio (it’s only available in audio; it’s free, so it’s good for seeing if you like the narrator, and how could you not like Kobna? but it’s not a good introduction to the series, because it assumes a lot of prior knowledge of the world) so if it was poorly copy-edited, I didn’t notice: A Rare Book of Cunning Device https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07252SLDB/ It suffers from the same abrupt ending as the more recent novella, but overall I liked it better. After all, it’s got Kobna Holdbrook-Smith (and the audio for Furthest Station won’t be out until September).

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    1. I have have to emphatically agree that these are books that are very good when read but become extraordinary when voiced by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith. He has an amazing voice, perfect timing and brings Peter Grant to life in a way that is rare, even among the best narrators.

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      1. I hate audio but now I must listen. I do have the audio novella somewhere on this computer but I really hate being read to. Must cowgirl up and listen.

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    2. The thing that drives me crazy is deliberate: Peter uses “me and her” when it should be “She and I.” And then the mistakes: sometimes he says, “I know it should be ‘Leslie and I’ but it makes Nightingale crazy when I say “Leslie and me” after an example when it should be “Leslie and me” because the object of a preposition. It’s like a fingernail down a blackboard every time, although it’s probably colloquially more correct given Peter’s background. He’s so careful about everything else, it just seems like a pretension.

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      1. LOL! I didn’t catch that second grammar joke where he uses Leslie and me properly, and then confides that he does it to make Nightingale crazy. That’s so Peter. Also, a very clever way of showing that the AUTHOR knows what’s what. I think Aaronovitch likes tweaking noses. He’s a rather prickly guy, and I like that about him.

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    3. In Oz (and I’m therefore assuming in U.K. English) we use further where US English uses farther (farther is acceptable to but not really used). We say ‘the post office is a bit further down the street’ so furthest station is right.

      And Jenny, to my ear, me and her, would not be out of place for someone speaking the kind of not posh English accent Peter has in my head. Not grammatically correct but okay colloquially. Aussies grow up watching a lot of UK TV as well as US so that may be why it doesn’t bug me. I say I’m trilingual in English ?

      The audiobook novella is cute. And the narrator is very good. Tempted to get them on audio. I really like this series. Read the first one ages ago but then came back and glommed the rest earlier this year when my mum bought all the paperbacks.

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      1. Huh. Did not realize that about “me and her.” It’s fingernails down a blackboard for me. Also good to know about “further,” since here we’re taught that “farther” is a measurable distance and “further” is an unmeasurable distance. Which brings me to another fingernails-down-a-blackboard mistake: “fewer” and “less.” “Fewer” is something you can count, “less” is something you can’t. So you can have “fewer jelly beans” but you can’t have “less jellybeans.” (AAAAAAAAAAAAGH.) Fewer pieces of toast, less jam.
        And now I’m hungry.

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        1. I learned the further/farther difference in the US the first time I had a US copy edit. It’s on my list of things I check before handing in a book. And then I have to check I’m not using USisms I’ve trained myself to type for fiction when writing stuff for the day job here. There are so many little differences in the flavours of English. No wonder it’s hard to learn.

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          1. It’s not just between countries, either. My southern Ohio isms creep in all the time. Like “That yard needs mowed,” which sounds fine to me, but which evidently should be “That yard needs to be mowed.”

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    4. I’ve only listened to the audiobooks, and like Stephen Briggs with Pratchett and Barbara Rosenblatt with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody books, I can’t “read” them any other way. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith *is* Peter in my head. And his Nightingale…

      Some of the audiobooks are available on hoopla and may be available through your library for free.

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  6. This series has become my comfort zone. I recently re-read the lot of them and picked up on so many things I missed. I also love how effortlessly Aaronovitch includes details (I love when he goes on minor architectural tangents) and how he’s turned London into a character all on its own. I always have a map of the city close to hand.

    I also think these books are a masterclass in how to diversify your characters without making them JUST their diversity. You care about the secondary characters because they’re wonderful characters, but the fact that they’re diverse just makes the universe feel just that much more inclusive.

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    1. I think the fact that Peter is mixed race and that the books are first person has a lot to do with that. He sees that Guleed wear a hijab, but he just describes the color or the gold embroidery. She’s just this woman he works with and respects, but the hijab is beautiful so he notices it. And that’s it. Abigail is his cousin on his mother’s side, but her race comes up very few times in asides, like when her big, fluffed out pony tail keeps her from putting the hood on her hoodie up, so she wears a cap instead; it’s one of those details that makes Abigail and the other characters so vivid. And there are the few times that somebody says something clueless about him because of the color of his skin, like assuming he can take hot weather because of where he “comes from” (that would be London, born and bred). It probably helps that most of the books are set in London since vibrant cities tend to be diverse. But Peter is not an angry young man, he’s an observant, smart, incredibly patient young man, so the reader just takes in everything that Peter does without judgment.

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  7. I love these books, I do re-read them, I like Peter so much. I also love history and London, and it’s a continuation with a new voice of the English mysteries I’ve read forever. I love the contrast between Nightingale and Peter, and their relationship.

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  8. One of my all time favorite series. I haven’t read either graphic novel as they don’t work on my kindle – sounds like that’s a good thing.

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  9. I’m on my fourth re-read of the series right now. After I got the novella, it just seemed like the right time to start over again at the beginning. I also bought the graphic novels, even though I HATE reading graphic novels. I enjoyed them for what they were, but would rather read the story than look at pictures. I have a hard time following along with pictures. I love this series. I love Peter Grant, Nightingale, all of the characters. I love that Peter gets distracted with “how” the magic works no matter how much Nightingale lectures at him to pay attention. I love his architectural obsession. I love how much he still loves Lesley even after SPOILER. I even enjoy looking up all the British slang and products that are mentioned. This is my second favorite world to live in, right after Discworld.

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  10. I am so glad to hear you love these novels, Jenny — this is one of my very favorite series of books, which makes me want to give them to all my friends and MAKE them love them like I do. Haven’t read the novella, and only a few of the graphic novels, but man do I love the series. The man can’t complete more of them fast enough for me.

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  11. I don’t have a problem with Simone – the poor boy (and don’t forget that he is still very young) desperately needs something normal and comforting in his life after surviving the first book. Women might hit the chocolate, icecream or the shops – young men tend towards guilt-free sex. The important thing is that he demonstrates the ability to grow, although not too fast – the books, after all, take place over a relatively short timeframe.

    I’m also fine with the language. As an Australian, I’ve grown up watching and reading Australian, American and UK stories; UK stories in particular (TV, film or books) often have finely nuanced class and location signifiers, usually shown through characters’ language use. As a working-class Londoner, Peter’s native grammar and syntax would not be what is commonly called ‘BBC English’ – in fact, if he had spoken like that as a child, the rest of the kids would have beaten it out of him. This is not to say that he doesn’t understand (or is incapable of producing) so-called ‘proper’ English, just that he speaks more than one version of English. And that he loves to get a rise out of Nightingale…

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    1. I think for me it was more that it’s the only grammar mistake he makes. His syntax is relaxed and informal, but it’s not grammatically incorrect. I’m also okay with him hitting the sheets with Simone, except he kept swerving away from the story to, uh, swerve her, even though he wasn’t her type. Sigh. I know. I’m wrong.

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  12. I thought ‘Rivers of London’ was brilliant; especially enjoyed the take on London, since I used to live there, and worked in Bloomsbury and Covent Garden. But it got too dark for me. I stopped buying them, and borrowed the most recent one from the library – then baled after a chapter or two. It’s not fun for me anymore.

    I enjoyed ‘Foxglove Summer’ purely for its setting – about sixty miles south of me down the Welsh border; but I agree it was disappointing otherwise.

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    1. The end of the first one is a shocker, and then the rest of the books deal with that aftermath, but I never saw them as dark, at least compared to most of modern mystery (say The Fall or MacDiarmid’s stuff). There are resolutions. Peter gets smarter and accumulates a lot of support people throughout the books. His mom and dad are always there. I may have a duller edge for dark because of all the apocalyptic story that’s around (is it the end of the world? are they all gonna die? is their President Trump? no? LIGHT FICTION). For example, they discover something supernatural but benign in Whispers Underground, and in the next books, they’ve protected it and helped it. And there’s a lot of humor, even if it’s understated. I love it that by the last book, even stations that are farther away from Peter’s supposedly secret branch hear his name and order him not to destroy any national landmarks on their patches. I love the Rivers, especially Beverley Brook, but also the way they’re all sisters and very careful not to invade each other’s waterways. And the throwaway supporting plots are almost always wonderful: Abigail seeing a ghost and talking to foxes, Peter meeting the little boy and bringing Beverley to help him and watching them both dive into the river, Molly’s cooking excesses, Dad’s jazz gigs, Peter’s practice attempts at new spells, the ME Walid who keeps showing them scans of their brains on magic . . . it’s a marvelously stable, bright world that darkness enters and is then, if not vanquished, at least defeated in the moment.

      Having said all of that, I bailed after the second one because the whole thing seemed confusing and I kept tripping over Simone–guys are dying, there’s a vagina dentata roaming the streets, and you’re boffing her again? Come on, Peter. But then I went back for Whispers Underground and that was good and The Hanging Tree was very good (I’ve only read that one once) and so was The Furthest Station. Basically, I’m in for whatever he brings out next in novel/novella form.

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      1. I don’t read or watch most popular stuff: I hate the fashion for violent melodrama. Don’t watch or listen to the news, either (I read it instead); so I’m not hardened like most people now. Maybe I’ll give the last one another go sometime.

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        1. I waited forever for the latest one from the library then I couldn’t bring myself to read more than the first chapter. After a week I returned it to the library so the next person on the list could read it.

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      2. I kind of know what you mean about the sex-hungry Simone in the Soho book, but at the same time there is that lovable scruffy group of young jazz guys who are struck speechless when they realize that Peter’s dad is actually a jazz legend to them. I so loved the way they would pop up in strange places in case there was a chance to meet the old man. *sigh*

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  13. I’ve loved all of these. Tried the first graphic novel and it wouldn’t load on my kindle in a readable format, so gave up on that, but kept right on with the text novels. I have to get the novella in e-format now … got the hardcover from Subterranean Press but one day soon I will be doing a binge-read and I want to be able to just mow through them all.

    Peter Grant is one of THE great modern characters, IMO. I actually really liked “Foxglove Summer” almost *because* Peter was on his own, out of his comfort zone, and had to step up and be a hero in that context.

    The Lesley storyline is very sad and I have hopes that BA can bring her back to the Folly at some point. And I’ll agree that the Faceless Man storyline needs to get wound up; this is not a series that needs an Unstoppable Foe.

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  14. I love how he has really thought through the consequences of his magical world in interesting ways–Peter and Beverley’s first night together, and Beverley’s sister explaining why she thinks their relationship should stop now. I have to go read the novella….

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    1. I like how he built in the Kryptonite: you do too much magic, your brain rots. I think there’s something else going on with the Faceless Man, too, some kind of degeneration of humanity.

      What I can’t figure out is Punch. Is he protecting Lesley? Has he become part of the Faceless Man? I need to reread the first one again because he’s definitely got a presence in the last one. Fingers crossed Peter solves that mess in the next one. Even Moriarty went over the Falls.

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  15. I love Foxglove Summer. Maybe it’s because I’m a country girl but I really do, even though I was exasperated by all the loose ends.

    I’m somewhat peeved that my kindle refuses to let me have Furthest Station until September. Have any other UK readers managed to get their hands on it?

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