Not Dead Yet

I’ve been working on the paper edit, cleaning house (the never-ending job), and hosting Krissie and Lani and Sweetness and Light, so I haven’t been here.  But I’ve been working, I swear.  Doing the second pass through on the paper edit on Act One, so that’ll be up soon (Krissie goes home tomorrow).  And Lani took a big bag of yarn home, and Krissie’s car is packed to the roof with it.  That sounds like an exaggeration,but it’s not.  Here’s what my living room looked like when we started:

Yes, I have a yarn problem, although it’s much less since I filled Krissie’s car with the stuff. And in my defense, I dumped it all in the middle of the room to sort it; it had been on shelves around the room, not piled on the floor like that.  

We also went shopping and I bought birdhouses to put on my fenceposts, so I’ll be doing that this week.  And I think I’ve figured out how to put a ceiling in my bedroom, so there’s that.  And tonight I’m cleaning out my closet so Krissie will have more bags to put in her car..  So I’ve been VERY productive.  

And I did keep working on the paper edit.  I have a ton of notes to double check, but mostly I am ready to charge on to the last three acts, which should be roughly 65,000 words and I have 30,000 words already, although you know how that goes, I’ll have to cut a lot of them.  

Mostly we just laughed.

 

 

67 thoughts on “Not Dead Yet

  1. Hello Jenny, I am going to Use your blog,(it is the only one I visit) to ask a question OK? I’ll take that as a yes. Why are there so many different postal charges from the U. S. to Canada. I want to order an out of print book (Alice Tilton if you are interested) and the postal rates are from 6.25 to$20. I can not understand this, the postage from G. B. Is cheaper!!
    ps it is a paperback.

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  2. I couldn’t help but gasp and laugh at the yarn photo. I felt much better about my own stash of yarn, so thanjs for that!

    But how nice to have such good friends who laugh and pay and help you sort out the yarn. 🙂

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  3. Wow, that is a lot of yarn. I like the colors though, just put up a wall of multicolored yarn and call it a decorating choice. Laughing with friends is always good, keep it up.

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  4. (-: It looks like a wonderful time for you guys! And oh, all the pretty yarns!

    I have far too much yarn . . . and even more fabric. I need someone to take away a car’s load worth.

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  5. Feeling better about my fabric stash now (though sad that I haven’t managed to make up more of it over the years.) My yarn stash is quite tiny. I think that your problem here is that you’re buying not only for yourself, but for all your characters.

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  6. Imma gonna show that photo to my hubby — my stash is nowhere near as impressive as yours, even if he thinks it’s getting out of hand.. Although, I do have to admit, whereas I used to be able to keep it relatively well confined, it has begun leaking out of its places of captivity recently. Sigh.

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    1. “…it has begun leaking out of its places of captivity recently.”

      Yep. and “It doesn’t matter that I don’t have some place to put this new stuff, because I’m going to use it RIGHT AWAY!” mmmhmmm, SURE I am.

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  7. Honestly, I looked at that pic of your yarn room and I just wanted to dive in and burrow. ^.^ If you ever want to do a random giveaway/contest with yarn as prizes, I WILL TAKE IT. *cough*

    Glad you had a wonderful visit with them, and that the writing’s coming along! 😀

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  8. Ok, you know what I saw there? A hoard. An organized and tidy one, but like a level one hoarder. Mainly because I’m a level one hoarder with dips into level two at bad emotional states.

    Also, yay for sisters. I haven’t seen my sisters and fake nieces and nephew in far too long. I may get yelled at, lovingly, soon.

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    1. That’s what I said to Krissie, but she said I’m not a hoarder because I give stuff away all the time and hoarders don’t.
      I think I’m just a consumer.

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  9. From far away, it looks like paradise! But having a yarn and fabric stash of my own (though not of these epic proportions), I know it’s tricky. Either it’s the wrong kind of material or the wrong color or there’s just not enough of the stuff that’s perfect for what I want to make. Reason enough to buy more.

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  10. See, I’m lucky, my craft obsession is beads. They are reallyreallysmall. Easy to hide a lot of them in a relatively small space.

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    1. Ha, yeah, I love beads too. They do take up less space. Unfortunately, they are also much easier to sneak into the house than the big bags of yarn. And as a result, they are claiming more and more and more real estate in my crafting room. The pace of territorial expansion is slower for obvious reasons, but it’s still there! 😀

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  11. Advice I’ve not been asked for: Get cracking on the knitting. Whilst churning out the story drafts. I’m sure It All Can Be Done.

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    1. I don’t knit. I’m not allowed to have pointy objects.
      I have hooks. And crooks. As in, “By . . .”

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      1. Ooh. I am in awe of the yarn. I am a knitter, but I need to learn to crochet now–I need it for a baby blanket. Are there any beginner resources you might suggest? I usually just google, but I have yet to find a resource that will just explain what the terms mean. There’s a lot more variation in crochet than in knitting!

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        1. (-: I’m sure you’ll get lots of advice here, but I think the big thing to remember is that the UK and the US have different names for the stitches (and for the hooks, IIRC), and also Japanese crochet nomenclature is a little different. There are also icons.

          But I find YouTube to be extremely useful to learn new stitches and refresh my memory on old ones. I just have to make sure in the descriptions that my pattern and the YouTube tutorial match.

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          1. I’m just the opposite. Love crochet, hate to purl. Need to figure out a way to purl without stabbing myself in the chin.

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        2. Thanks for all the suggestions! The different names (double to treble, etc) are annoying, but I think I’ve got what I need to make the snitch for my Gryffidor blanket. Now here’s hoping that my nephew someday loves Harry Potter as much as his mom does!

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          1. You’re making a snitch? Oh, that sounds like so much fun! (And it’s the kind of little project that I love, if it’s 3D. If it’s applique, that’s fun, too.) I love how crochet is so flexible and shape-able. I’m in total awe of knitters who do cables and all sorts of fancy things like Fair Isle, but I don’t really have the patience for that with needles. Crochet or cross-stitch are more my style when it comes to that sort of thing, but I haven’t seen really decent cables.

            My favorite crochet thing to do is ringlets. (Chain, then double back and put two longer stitches into each chain so it makes a little curly-cue.) Not practical at all, but I make some fabulous octopuses, ghosts and pumpkin vines . . . .

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          2. Miki,
            Do you have a link to a basic ringlet pattern? I have some dolls that need hair and my pattern has gone the way of the wind. I am not good enough to not have some written directions. Thanks.

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          3. Phred, I’ll look, but I think it’s so dependent upon your hook, your yarn and how long you need a ringlet. When I do it with the Japanese equivalent of Red Heart, and the crochet hook I like best (G?), if I chain 15, then sc twice in each chain on the way back, I get something that’s about two inches (5 cm??) long. I would say just do it at 15 for a gauge, and then you can multiply. If you need it twice as long, chain 30. Three times as long? Chain 45.

            I would guess. Because it’s a spiral.

            But seriously, it crochets up so quick and is so cool that you won’t regret the little time it takes to make the gauge, and you can use it as a bang or something. (-: Or a little curl in the middle of her forehead!

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHa-nFLjGHY How to do it. Six minute video, but you get the gist of it in two minutes.

            You can use double crochets or triple crochets, even. All the patterns I’m seeing just say “Chain as many as desired then add three (counts as one double crochet.) I assume you’d add two for a single crochet, and maybe four for a triple crochet.

            (-: Please say you’ll try one. You’ll be out 10 minutes and a couple of yards of yarn, is all, and then you’ll see how it works, and how easy it is to scale up or down.

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  12. I’m so very happy that you all have had a good time together, full of laughter and joy. And I humbly bow in awe of your yarn stash. I thought the one I used to have was very large, but yours is much much larger. You are clearly a Goddess.

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  13. It’s so great that you got the band back together again! Lovely to see you all in one place. And that yarn is…impressive. Makes me wish I could still crochet.

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  14. I have a crochet story. When I told my mum I was pregnant she gave me the well-used baby shawl my aunty had crocheted for me when I was a baby. I told my aunty this and she said ‘that’s actually the second one’. Before I was born, she’d started one in a much finer wool, it was taking too long, so she started over. However, she had kept the half-crocheted shawl, pattern and wool for 30 years and two cross-world moves. She finished it, and gave it to me when my daughter was born. Isn’t that lovely?

    Things made with love are the best.

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    1. LOL, that is lovely! And it gives me a great deal of hope for some of my unfinished projects (-:.

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    2. I just got back from a business trip to the US and I always swing by my folks in northern MI before returning home. In a walk-in closet down in the basement, I found a sparkly white crocheted shawl. Took it up to my mom and said, hey, do you know who did this? (She neither knits nor crochets.) Oh, yes, she said, your dad’s great aunt…

      Uh, Mom, WRONG! I did it when I was sixteen, it was one of the first things I made following someone else’s pattern (Red Heart!). I hadn’t seen that shawl in forever and so I brought it home to Germany with me. I wore it over my dress to my senior prom which was (mumble, mumble) years ago, so it’s practically antique, and definitely vintage now!

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      1. I have a dress like that. I adore it and I just realized recently that I bought it in the 80s. So vintage . . .
        Congratulations on rediscovering that shawl!

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      2. I was visiting my mom about 5 years ago when she pulled out tons of hand knitted sweaters, skirts, dresses and coats from the 50s, 60s and 70s knit by my grandmother, my mother, and even some by me. We started a family project of photographing my two teenage daughters, my mother and me in these vintage knits. I documented them on my blog; the first post of the series is here:
        https://knitigatingcircumstances.com/2012/06/17/retrospective-knits-part-1/.
        This was so much fun. I am always thankful that my mom hoarded these items and never gave them away.

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        1. I would like this 15 times if I could! Gorgeous family, Kelly, and gorgeous pics! I really love the dress style at the top, and I’ve made it a few times in fabric. Absolutely classic, and it flatters such a wide range of shapes and sizes. The coats for working also opened up my eyes. Cardigans that I like are running about $100 or more, and then I have to pay for shipping to Japan. (-: And any time I’m spending crocheting, I’m not doing the other kind of spending, so it might save me lots of money in the long-run.

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        2. How cool. A friend recently was sorting a large donation of fabric and yarn for her quilt guild and came across a knitting pattern book from 1944 of children’s clothing. The cutest dresses I have seen in ages, though the knitted diaper cover was odd looking. She kept the book as a sorting fee.

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  15. A friend recently taught me how to knit as a way to entertain myself during recovery. I showed my husband your picture as a warning of what might be to come and he laughed it off and said he wasn’t afraid.

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  16. My Mom joined a knitters’ group at our church. I think they do baby blankets; hats and mittens and possibly socks. Her group is always willing to take yarn. Maybe there’s a knitters’ group in your area that would welcome some of the yarn, if you need to part with more?

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  17. With all due respect and in awe of your crafting prowess and the creativity it unleashes in you, I must admit a little bit of claustrophobia panic kicked in for me while looking at all that yarn.

    So I had to focus on the beautiful stained glass above the doorway – It’s absolutely gorgeous!

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    1. That’s above the opening to the kitchen. I put it in and I’m still not sure about it because it’s way too ornate for the cottage. I had simpler, brighter glass, but Krissie said that one. And it is beautiful.

      I’ll put up a new picture when I get the room organized again. It’s alread much better than it was, but the idea is that I spend most of my time writing . . .

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    1. (-: I had to giggle a little bit about “you missed your calling.” I don’t think she missed her calling at all — but man, Jenny sure gets called A LOT! It’s kind of natural that she’d have to decline the offer of yarn shop owner (or suitcase designer, or upholsterer, or all the other things she’s dabbled in so wonderfully).

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  18. Off topic question! I’m eating breakfast (porridge with blueberries and brown sugar) and I have leftover, and I remember a recipe I spotted ages ago for oatmeal pancakes. What is oatmeal, because I don’t think it’s what I think it is here. We have:
    Oats – the raw, uncooked ingredient. Usually with a classification, e.g. ‘rolled oats’ – oat grain rolled flat, ‘pinhead oats or Irish oats’ – oat grain cut into nibs rather than rolled, and ‘Scotch oats’ – rolled oats also cut up a bit, so they make a quicker cooking porridge.
    Porridge – the hot breakfast made by cooking oats
    Oatmeal – oats that have been ground into flour.

    I’ve googled, I’m still unclear. If a US recipe calls for oatmeal, is it asking for oat flour, rolled oats, or cooked porridge?

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    1. Rolled oats. (Although Scotch oats sound like what’s called “quick oats” here and would probably work, too.) “Oatmeal” is oats of any sort cooked into porridge, and oats ground into flour is called “oat flour.” In case you wish to explore more Us-ian recipes.

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      1. Gah! Replied too soon. “Oatmeal” has the dual meaning of what you make porridge out of and the cooked porridge you eat. Not having seen the recipe, I would guess it wants rolled oats, but it might want you to fry the cooked oats, since fried cornmeal mush is definitely a thing, and cornmeal mush is the corn-equivalent of cooked oatmeal porridge.

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    2. Probably rolled oats. Most our oatmeal baking is done from that round cardboard box with a Quaker on the front.

      Having said that, go for it. Oats is oats and porridge would probably make great pancakes.

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  19. By the pictures, it appears that I’m really an underachiever when it comes to yarn stashes (although my quilting fabric stash is epic). Inspired in part by this post, I went out today and got some more yarn for the chemo caps I knit. I’ve been knitting fairly obsessively for months, so I was down to just little balls of a few yards each, so I got a whole bunch of navy yarn to be the background for stripes and dots of the leftover bits.

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    1. That’s amazing. My kids would love to have one of those. Although I wonder about washing and drying it. We make a lot of messes and crumbs.

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