Learn to Discover and Revise in the New Year!

Lani Diane Rich is offering her Discovery and Revision classes (those are two different classes) starting in January. As she describes the revision class:

I’m going to be doing live audio classes on the net with streaming and chat where students can ask questions I’ll answer right there. I’m going to be offering audio downloads of skill-set modules (like dialogue, motivation, scene structure, etc,) and setting up a private discussion section on the forums.

If you’re planning on revising your NaNo draft next year, or if you’re planning on revising anything, Lani’s revision class is for you. The Discovery class is fun–she gives a different discovery technique each week, like collaging, sound tracks, and I forget what else–and the revision class is work because that’s what revision is (I’m mired in AKMG Maybe This Time revisions now which is why I’ve been neglecting you), but they’re both tremendously valuable.

Go to the StoryWonk website to learn more. Lani’s really VERY good at this teaching thing.

32 thoughts on “Learn to Discover and Revise in the New Year!

  1. thanks for the tip 🙂

    I was wondering if you were gonna teach anytime soon? I brought this up before that I think you would be a fantastic influence on graduate MFA students. And I think you said that it would need to be in Ohio but have you considered low-residency programs? You can always just test out the waters as a writer-in-residence for two weeks. I’m getting my degree from Vermont College of Fine Arts and honestly, it’s such an incredible community of writers. For this being a lonely profession, a loving, academic environment that encourages freedom of thought and exploration makes all the difference. I’m sure if you were interested you could also teach special classes while visiting Mollie – the options are limitless (NYU, Hopkins, etc. are all close by)

    Also, your professor from Ph.D. program (the name evades me at the moment), I think he teaches in CA now, does he teach smaller groups or adult classes open to the public?

    Any other workshops/experiences you’d recommend?

    Thanks!

    Happy Holidays

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  2. I’m teaching a three hour master class in fiction at Thurber House in Columbus Saturday, June 19 from 1-4. It’ll cover stuff I cover here all the time, probably pretty much the same thing I did in NJ this year. I don’t want to go anywhere for two weeks; I think all the traveling I did in the past years has just killed any interest I have in leaving home unless I’m going to see the Parthenon or something amazing. And even then . . .
    I have no idea what Ron Carlson is teaching now. Try the website or e-mail the department he’s teaching in.
    Workshops I recomment: Lani’s obviously. I think if you’re revising or you need to learn discovery, there’s nobody better, plus you don’t have to hunt down her workshop, it’s right online. Also Michael Hague is great; he had a huge impact on my writing. Don Maass gives great workshop, too. I’d go to hear anything Deb Dixon said; she’s brilliant. I’ve heard really good things about Barb Samuel’s online workshops and I think she’s terrific. I know there are more, but I’m brain empty right now. Oh, yeah, and BOB MAYER. Great teacher.

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    1. RWA Nationals is in Nashville next year and Nashville has a replica of the Parthenon. Just sayin’, could kill two birds with one trip there. 🙂

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        1. I do hope you get to do a workshop, but I’d settle for the chance to get a book signed. Will you take part in the literacy signing?

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    2. Thurber? Really?! Oh, I am SO going to be there. I think I’m on their mailing list for registrations, but you aren’t up on the website yet. They better not let anyone else have my slot or I WILL crash that party. Oh, yes, indeed. I will.

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      1. PS. Hope you’re not overly concerned about the stalker-ish tone of the previous post. I’m very busy and really don’t have time to do more instense stalking-type activities than read your blog and wander through the supermarket’s book section on grocery day, hoping to stumble on any book by you that I don’t already have. Wild Ride and AKMG aka MTT need to hurry up, dammit.

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  3. Lani’s revision class was superb, and I agree she’s a good teacher. I took the class in October. I love the classroom feeling and learn best that way, and it was neat to be able to raise a question and get an answer on the spot. Plus there were forums where we gals could chat and ask questions and just generally hang out.
    I’d figured there wouldn’t be too much I didn’t know about revisions but boy, was I wrong. I picked up some amazing, truly helpful advice and did have a finished manuscript so applied the new knowledge to that. I think it’s a much better and stronger story for the effort.

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  4. I so want to take this Discovery class. I need the Revision class too, but I’m not finished with the first draft yet so one thing at a time. Must play with the budget to figure this out.

    Thanks for the heads up!

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  5. Oooo…the Discovery class sounds awesome! Unfortunately I can’t swing it right now. 🙁 Is it something that she might do again, or should I go sell a kidney?

    On a Lani-related note – I’m getting my tonsils out on Friday, so I’m stocking up on some fun books to read for the week after that while I’m miserable. Since Dogs and Goddesses is the only thing she’s worked on that I’ve read, I wanted to pick up one or two of her other titles. Do you have any recommendations for which ones I should look for first?

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    1. I liked all Lani’s books. I’d recommend reading Crazy in Love before Wish You Were Here as the characters are introduced in CiL first. But my favorites are Maybe Baby (love the humor!) and the “sequel” The Comeback Kiss. If I’m recommending, I’ll suggest the funny romance Maybe Baby first. If you want a bit of a mystery Crazy in Love. If you want a more thoughtful chicklit – heroine growth, The Fortune Quilt or Time Off for Good Behavior or Ex and the Single Girl.

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      1. What Kelly said about CIL and WYWH, but my first Lani book was the Fortune Quilt and I think that is just magnificent. I think I read Maybe Baby next. I did realize as I then pursued the books in order, that some of the characters overlap in the world, but the books all stand alone too. A Little Ray of Sunshine had me misting up several times.

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        1. I read Crazy In Love first, too. Have loved everything Lani has written – The Fortune Quilt is really wonderful. Good luck with the tonsils!

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    2. Keep the kidney. Sell those tonsils, since you seem to have lost interest in them entirely. Feel better soon.

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      1. I haven’t read enough Lani, either — maybe if I’m a good girl, Santa will be kind. But The Fortune Quilt was excellent! New Age-y, but looking at itself and laughing along with itself, kind of thing.

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      1. Santa went shopping for me today – she found The Fortune Quilt for my stocking. That Santa! Sadly that’s all the books she found by Lani. So…. found some new on Amazon.ca. CIL, WYWH, MB, TCK. Sadly A Little Ray of Sunshine is not to be found.

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  6. Oh, boy! A Lani newbie! Get her first book, pronto, “Time Off for Good Behavior,” and then my second fave of hers is “The Fortune Quilt.” Subtle layers, good smart-ass women, wonderful emotional payoffs. I’m always happy after I read Lani’s books.

    And I second the value of the Revision class. I learned so much more than I ever expected was available for me to learn. (Obviously no grammar was taught in that class.)

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  7. I took Lani’s Discovery class and loved it – can’t wait for Revision in January.
    I recommend any of Lani’s books, esp. The Fortune Quilt and Little Ray of Sunshine.

    Jenny, please, please, please teach an online workshop… 🙂

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  8. What Kelly said. All of Lani’s books are wonderful. My favorites are The Fortune Quilt and Little Ray of Sunshine. Oh, and Wish You Were Here.

    The Discovery class in October was wonderful and really helped open up my project for NaNo. I can’t wait for the Revision class to start.

    Lani always says that future classes are based on demand, so be sure to tell her you are interested in taking a class.

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  9. It’s become Maybe This Time now? Cool! I like!

    The only problem I can see with that is the earworming potential… Liza is singing in my head right this minute! (Okay, that’s not an actual problem.)

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  10. I have had “Maybe This Time” from Cabaret in my head for about 2 weeks. It was on Glee awhile back and I recently heard it again.
    Funny how it popped up on here. I like it. 🙂

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  11. The Discovery workshop-great. While on the Storywonk site, I surfed a bit, and came upon the GHH blog (Lani’s Dec 7 or 9 entry), Char/Dogs & Goddesses. Truly, I was under a rock until I came out for a very much needed reading break, where I discovered you all. I now know the complete history of GHH and have an expanded vocabulary and new laugh lines. Lani’s class is probably full now with emerging writers. Have fun, sounds wonderful.

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    1. Lani’s Blog – Dec 3, 2009, The Glittery HooHa of Christmas Past.
      The complete history of GHH – April 9, 2007 – Modern Literary Terms: The Glittery HooHa in Jenny’s archives. (Almost two years ago, I am so late for the party.) Just reading the comments=smiles and laughter. Thanks.

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  12. Hi All, this is the first time I’ve commented – although I’ve been following this blog for about a year now. I know we’ve moved on from the ‘importance of the title’, but I’ve been thinking about it for days now and have decided I have to comment (if only to prevent me from constantly thinking about it). I should first start by saying I’m not a writer, but I read constantly.

    For me the title isn’t that important (except if it’s really bad and I would be embarrassed to be seen in public with it), it’s the cover art and color. The cover/colour is always what gets my attention first, and then if I like that I will pick up the book and read the blurb.

    I recently bought a book by Robin McKinley called Sunshine and loved it. I originally picked it up because the cover was gorgeous (a rich red, gold lettering and a beautiful chandelier) and I loved the story so much I went to buy a copy for my friend. The copy the store had, had a dark gloomy, bland building on the cover. I didn’t buy it.

    Same story, same title and I just couldn’t bring myself to buy that copy.

    For me the cover has to match the ‘feel’ of the book, and I personally feel more annoyed if the cover promises something the book doesn’t deliver (ie the book cover promises humor and fun, and I get a depressing drama). I enjoy most genres, but want to have an idea of what I’m getting when I pick up the book. For me the cover art (and blurb) holds much more sway than the title.

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  13. Thanks so much for all the helpful info!! Im registersted for Lani’s class (catching up on her novels now) and look forward to taking the other classes by the people you recommended. Much obliged!

    Thanks again! Happy Holidays :)))

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  14. Thank you so much for this! I clicked on over and read the description for the Revision class. It sounded fabulous so I called my hubby and begged him to let me sign up. He said, “yes!” It may be the best Christmas present ever. =D

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  15. You know, that Maybe This Time bothers me because it sounds hopeful. And your protag is not hoping that this time with her ex will work, not on any conscious level, so, for me it’s misleading. And kind of wimpy. I have no better suggestions, though. Sorry

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